19th PMO: Instructions for Qualifying Stage (Region 5)


The 19th Philippine Mathematical Olympiad Qualifying Stage for Region V will be held this October 22, 2016, Saturday, at the Ateneo de Naga University, Naga City, Camarines Sur.  The exam rooms are at the second and third floors of the Francis C. Dolan, S.J. Hall; registration will be done in the same building.

If you sent your application forms through e-mail, please bring the original application forms with you and submit them to the registration staff on October 22, 2016, if possible.

Participants and coaches must bring identification cards that have ID pictures, preferably those issued by their schools.

Registration starts at 10:00 am.  Participants should be in their assigned rooms by 1:45 pm.  The exam will start at 2:00 pm and is expected to last 2 hours.  Participants who arrive late must take the exam in a room reserved for late-comers (and not their assigned room) so as not to disturb the other participants who started on time.  The exam ends at 4:00 pm, even for those who arrived late.

Once the exam has started, participants may not leave the room until it has ended.  Participants who need to use the bathroom must do so before the exam starts.

Participants who leave the room before the exam has ended are considered to have finished the exam; they must submit their questionnaires and answer sheets to the proctor before they leave and they are not allowed to return to continue the exam.

The only materials that the students are allowed to have on their desks immediately before the examination are:  blue or black ballpoint pen, pencil, eraser, ruler, compass, and protractor.  All other items such as notes, books, cellular phones, etc. are not allowed on your desks, but these may be placed in a designated area in the room.  Calculators are not allowed.

2016 ACM-ICPC Philippines Southern Luzon


I was a problem setter and judge for the 2016 ACM-ICPC Philippines Southern Luzon Invitational Contest held last October 1, 2016 at the Ateneo de Naga University.

The winning team was from the University of the Philippines, Los Baños. It solved 7 of the 12 problems. (The teams were given 5 hours.) The results are shown below. (The image has been slightly edited.)


If I’m not mistaken, the warm-up problems were the same as last year’s.  The contest problems are here. I provided two contest problems: “C” (Billiard Paths 1) and “H” (Billiard Paths 2).  (My slides explaining my solutions are here and here.) As you can see from the scoreboard below, two teams attempted problem “C” (and both succeeded), and no team attempted problem “H.”


I was also a problem setter and judge in 20152014, and 2013.

May bago akong blog

Right now I’m a participant in a training sponsored by the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) and given by the Ateneo de Manila University (ADMU). I’m being trained to possibly train other teachers how to teach a new general education college course called “Matematika sa Makabagong Daigdig” (Mathematics in the Modern World) to be offered starting 2018. One of our problems is that there are practically no existing materials (articles, textbooks) written in Filipino about college-level mathematics. To try to address this problem, I’ve decided to create another blog that focuses on this new course. The URL is https://matematikasmd.wordpress.com/ . I hope to provide information and resources that will be of help to teachers and students of this course. (Note that it is a personal blog, and is in no way affiliated with CHED, ADMU, or any other institution.)

19th Philippine Mathematical Olympiad

The Philippine Mathematical Olympiad, a nationwide mathematics competition open to all junior and senior high school students of the Philippines, is carried out in three stages.

The qualifying stage (to be held on October 22, 2016, Saturday) consists of a written exam administered in fourteen (I think) regional testing sites. The exam consists of fifteen multiple-choice questions worth 2 points each, ten multiple-choice questions worth 3 points each, and six answers-only questions worth 6 points each.

The area stage (to be held on November 19, 2016, Saturday) consists of a written exam administered in testing sites for the four areas (Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, and National Capital Region). The exam consists of twenty answers-only questions and three open-ended questions that require full solutions.

The national stage (to be held on January 21, 2017, Saturday) consists of a written exam and an oral exam administered in Metro Manila. The written exam consists of four open-ended questions that require full solutions to be answered in 4.5 hours. The oral exam (which is open to the public) consists of 30 questions read to the participants and to be answered within a specified time for each item.

Each school may send up to twenty participants (students with a final grade of 88% (or its equivalent) in mathematics in the previous school year). The participants with the top fifty scores in the qualifying stage per area will qualify for the area stage. The participants with the top twenty scores (national ranking) in the area stage will qualify for the national stage. The national finalists will be qualified to join the International Mathematical Olympiad Summer Camp (IMOSC). The representatives of the country to the International Mathematical Olympiad will be selected from the participants of the IMOSC.

A copy of the Department of Education Advisory number 244, series of 2016 about the 19th PMO is here.

I am the regional coordinator for Region V (Bicol Region). Schools in Region V that are interested in participating should complete the official application form and submit it to me on or before 12:00 noon of September 23, 2016 (Friday). My contact information can be found in the official brochure.


This is my second Tanknator. (My first was in dark olive green.) It has a rotating turret. I had earlier blogged that “[a]lthough it belongs to the HW Daredevils series (and not the HW Ride-Ons series), it seems that it can hold a LEGO Minifigure in its turret.” It seems that I was mistaken. According to the Hot Wheels Wikia, a LEGO Minifigure doesn’t fit; this model was made for Mega Bloks figures.


Alice fails to sell

A few months ago, I learned from Fine Books & Collections that the auction house Christie’s was selling a copy of the first issue of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in a stand-alone sale on June 16, 2016. They estimated it to sell for $2,000,000 to $3,000,000. The copy “is one of ten surviving copies still in original red cloth, only two of which are in private hands, the other described as “heavily worn.””

After the auction, I was excited to see what price the copy would realize, but a quick internet search did not yield any information. Even the Christie’s website was silent about what had happened.

It was only a few days ago that I learned from FB&C that (even though the bidding reached $1,800,000) the copy “failed to meet its reserve and did not sell.”