My favorite cars

There are a lot of cars that I really like: the Tucker 48 from 1948, the Lotus S1 Esprit from 1977, and the Chevrolet Caprice Classic from 1991. But the one that’s very special to me is the Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am Special Edition from 1977. I have quite a few Pontiac Firebirds now, and the latest addition to my collection is this Custom ’67 Pontiac Firebird, which is a different colored version of one that I blogged about before.

It used to be that whenever I blog about scale models, only Pontiac Firebirds get a special tag. That’s changing now, as there is a new car that I feel is worthy of having its own tag. I first discovered Nissan Skylines last year, when I blogged about a Matchbox ’71 Nissan Skyline 2000 GTX and a Tomica Nissan Skyline 2000GT-R Racing. When I saw this Nissan Skyline H/T 2000GT-R from 1973, I decided that Nissan Skylines would get their own tag. (I’ve just added the tag to the two previously mentioned blog posts.)

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’71 Pontiac Firebird Formula

I bought a Matchbox ’71 Pontiac Firebird Formula a few weeks ago, then promptly forgot I had it. So when I saw another one in a different store last week, I bought it, thinking that I didn’t have one yet. I’ll probably open one of the two in the future, to be placed on my Majorette Transporter. The base of the model indicates that its scale is 1:65. (I am quite annoyed by this. With not much effort, they could have created the model using the more standard scale of 1:64.) The Wikia page states that its body color is “Orange,” but the paint is actually metalflake orange.

Custom ’67 Pontiac Firebird

This Hot Wheels Custom ’67 Pontiac Firebird is a new casting. The Hot Wheels Wiki claims that the metal body is unpainted. The base and the interior are black plastic. The front wheels are smaller than those in the rear. I love the fact that the hood has been removed, exposing the engine.

The colors on the model’s engine (black in the middle, silver in the front) do not match the ones in the card’s image (silver in the middle, black in the front).

Spot the difference

What’s better than having two blue Hot Wheels ’77 Pontiac Firebirds? Having one of them be an error copy. As you can see from the picture below, the one on the right is missing the decorations on (at least) one side. While errors are highly sought after in the philatelic and numismatic world (and, in some cases, in the comic book collecting world), I’m not sure how they are treated in the toy business.

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